If It Isn't Broken, Don't Fix It (unless you want to break it...)

In December of 2017, The Federal Drug Administration issued a Draft Guidance proposing that the guidelines governing the manufacture and sale of homeopathic remedies in the United States for the last thirty years be withdrawn and replaced by an updated version. 

Non-Ordinary Realities

A number of years ago, a young woman in her early 20's we'll call Samantha sought out homeopathic treatment for difficulties she was experiencing during pregnancy.  She had given birth just a year or so earlier and had experienced problems toward the end of her term.  Now, this tine around Samantha was complaining of extremely low energy, poor digestion, generalized itching and irritability. 

Magnesium - Homeopathic and Otherwise

Magnesium is a mineral, one of six alkaline earth metals - along with beryllium, calcium, strontium, barium and radium - that make up the second column of the periodic table.  In nature, it can only be found as a salt, that is, in combination with other minerals such as magnesium carbonate, magnesium sulphate, magnesium citrate, to name but a few.  Elemental or free magnesium that is not combined with another element is a highly flammable, lightweight, shiny gray solid that can only be produced artificially.

Treating a Cerebral Vascular Accident

First this one morning, a man made his way into the clinic leaning heavily on the shoulder of a young boy.  As he entered, my attention, initially grabbed by the brilliant violet tunic top he wore, subsequently fell on the telltale curl of his left arm and the dragging of his left leg.  

Falling into a chair, he explained that in the night he awoke with the sensation that the left side of his body was heavy and weak.  Now, he was breathless, dizzy, his head hurt and his heart felt too large for his chest.  There was also a burning sensation internally and especially in the left thigh.

An African Funeral or Two...

You haven't partied until you've attended a funeral in Ghana - or, at least, in this region of the country where I've spent the last month.  Apparently, celebrating the dead is the main social event that takes place here.  They don't do birthdays and I haven't heard mention of a wedding, but I've seen more funerals than I can count.   

It is hard to miss them because they are three-day public affairs occupying the village center or some such prominent location to which, it seems, everyone is invited, regardless of their connection - or lack thereof - to the deceased.